Stocks making the biggest moves after hours: Amazon, Intel, Snap, Pinterest and more

Stock Market

In this article

A robot prepares to pick up a tote containing product at the Amazon Robotics fulfillment center on April 12, 2019 in Orlando, Florida.
Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images

Check out the companies making headlines after hours.

Amazon – Amazon jumped 7% in extended trading after reporting a first-quarter revenue beat. The online retail giant posted revenue of $127.4 billion, greater than the $124.5 billion consensus estimate published by Refinitiv. 

Intel – Intel shares were down 1.2% after initially rising in the wake of its first-quarter results. The semiconductor firm reported its largest-ever quarterly loss. However, it did beat analysts’ expectations on the top and bottom lines. The semiconductor firm posted a first-quarter loss of 4 cents per share ex-items on revenue of $11.7 billion. Analysts polled by Refinitiv forecasted a loss per share of 15 cents on revenue of $11.04 billion.

Snap – The social media stock tumbled nearly 20% in extended trading Thursday after the firm’s first-quarter results. Snap reported first-quarter revenue of $989 million, lower than the estimated $1.01 billion, according to Refinitiv data. On the other hand, Snap earned 1 cent per share, excluding items, which was better than the forecasted per-share loss of 1 cent. 

Pinterest – Pinterest shares dropped 8%. The image sharing firm surpassed expectations on the top and bottom lines in its first quarter, according to consensus estimates from Refinitiv. However, second-quarter revenue growth expectations were disappointing. The firm expects operating expenses to grow in the low teens. 

Boston Beer – Boston Beer shares slid 3.2% in extended trading. The brewery behind Samuel Adams and Twisted Tea brands missed analysts’ expectations on the top and bottom lines, according to Refinitiv data. 

First Solar – The solar stock shed more than 5% on disappointing first-quarter results. The firm reported earnings of 40 cents per share on $548 million in revenue. Analysts expected per-share earnings of $1.02 on revenue of $718 million, according to Refinitiv.

T-Mobile US – T-Mobile US shares declined as much as 2.5% after first-quarter revenue for the telecommunications firm came in lower than expected, according to Refinitiv.

Cloudfare – Cloudfare tumbled 23% in extended trading after posting weaker-than-expected first-quarter revenue and issuing a lackluster second-quarter and full-year forecast.

L3Harris Technologies – L3Harris Technologies added more than 3% in extended trading after beating first-quarter earnings and revenue expectations. The defense contractor posted first-quarter earnings of $2.86 per share ex-items on revenue of $4.47 billion. Analysts surveyed by Refinitiv expected per-share earnings of $2.85 on revenue of $4.25 billion.

Amgen – Amgen declined 2.2% after disappointing first-quarter revenue expectations. The biotech firm reported $6.11 billion in revenue, lower than estimates of $6.17 billion from analysts polled by Refinitiv. Amgen did beat on earnings expectations.

Fair Isaac – Shares fell 2% after Fair Isaac missed earnings estimates in its second quarter, though it did beat on revenue expectations. The data analytics firm behind the FICO score reported adjusted earnings of $4.78 per share, weaker than the consensus estimate of $5.04 per share, according to Refinitiv.

Gilead Sciences – Shares of the biopharmaceutical company fell about 1% in extended trading after it reported disappointing earnings, but topped revenue expectations, according to Refinitiv data.

Mondelez International – Mondelez International climbed 2% after posting first-quarter results that exceeded expectations on the top and bottom lines, according to consensus expectations from Refinitiv.

Articles You May Like

Increased longevity will bring profound social change
Sunak to declare Britain is ‘at a crossroads’ ahead of election
Can Europe’s economy ever hope to rival the US again?
Putin replaces security chiefs in surprise reshuffle
Australia’s budget is expected to target housing crisis as prices keep climbing